Tim Timmons | Crawfordsville, IN

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December 11, 2017

3/7/2014 4:34:00 PM
Hunting for mushrooms?

If you are a Hoosier, then you know all about mushroom hunting. If you are not, just know that this is not anything like submarine races.
Mushroom hunting is an annual rite of spring. Hoosiers (and I guess I'd have to admit that there are some other states involved in this as well) take to the outdoors and flock to the woods in hopes of finding a sackful of mouth-watering morsels (or morels).
Now, if you've never been mushroom hunting, there's advice aplenty on where to go, what to look for, all sorts of tricks of the trade. In fact, when you get right down to it, it's a lot like looking for and finding new employees.
No, no, no. It's not what you're thinking about dark places that smell bad.
Seasoned mushroom hunters head into the woods and look for where trees have fallen and decayed. They look above for certain hints in the canopy. They look for specific kinds of trees and ground cover.
When you go to look for new employees, go hunting in the right spots. If you need someone with skills not easily found in your market, shop regionally or nationally. If, on the other hand, you need someone who can easily be found next door, don't waste your valuable resources on expensive search firms or national advertising.
I would also recommend that you do what an old boss of mine once called "the rule of two." She said that you should always try to have two potential hires in your back pocket. A little phone work and a little networking makes that something doable. In today's world, e-mail helps as well.
And of course how much time you spend also depends on how much turnover you have. If you hardly ever have any openings, well, thanks for reading this week and sorry I haven't been of much help. If that's not the case, judge your time spent on this accordingly.
In the end, a little preparation and smart hunting can turn searches - whether for employees or mushrooms - into much more enjoyable outings.






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